Vinyl Flooring

Vinyl Plank Floors Versus Laminate Flooring
If you want to be confident in your choice of flooring for your home or commercial building, you should conduct some research. At first look, vinyl planks and laminate flooring appear to be very similar, and they are in many respects. While most people are primarily concerned with color and cost when it comes to flooring, there are many additional factors to consider, particularly if you’re deciding between vinyl and laminate for your new floor. Today, we will walk you through the choosing process and give you with important information regarding both laminate and vinyl flooring.
Vinyl Flooring
Let’s start with some fundamental knowledge on synthetic vinyl floors. As the name implies, this sort of floor is made entirely of synthetic vinyl. You may have encountered different types of vinyl flooring in the past, such as vinyl tiles or vinyl sheets. Unlike these samples, vinyl planks are slightly thicker, made up of numerous layers of PVC vinyl. Typically, the thickness of the plank indicates the quality of the flooring material. For the most part, all vinyl plank floors will fit side by side to form a floating floor, with plank thickness ranging from 1.5mm to 5mm.
Laminate Flooring
Unlike vinyl flooring, laminate floor planks are made of a wood core that is glued together with resin. The top layer, like a vinyl plank, will include a printed layer that provides color, grain, and texture to the floor. The top layer is comprised of durable plastic, which can withstand natural wear and tear on the floor. Again, as with vinyl flooring, a thicker plank suggests a higher grade material. Laminate thickness normally ranges between 6mm and 12mm.
Vinyl Plank Floors Versus Laminate Flooring
1. Applications: Laminate Floors
Laminate floors are one of the most adaptable flooring materials due to their longevity and large choice of colours and styles available. Natural wood and bonding resin make up over 90% of the ingredients of a laminate floor board. While laminate floors are engineered to withstand moisture and liquids, they can nevertheless deteriorate prematurely if exposed to excessive dampness. Laminate flooring should never be installed in the bathroom. The high concentration of moisture in one section of your home can quickly destroy your laminate.
Vinyl Planks
Unlike laminate, which is only partially resistant to water and moisture, vinyl planks are entirely resistant to all liquids. This makes it a great flooring material for use in every room of the house or commercial building, including kitchens, baths, mudrooms, and entrances. New vinyl planks are constructed from 100% waterproof materials, so you can be confident that they will be the ideal alternative for any space where water may accumulate on the floor.
2. Maintaining and Cleaning Laminate Floors
Because of their wood content, people may mistake their laminate floor for a wood surface and polish it. Fortunately, the protective coating on laminate floors makes them easy to maintain and keeps them appearing clean. Laminate can be cleaned with either a wet or dry mop, depending on the mess. Water or wet spills should not be allowed to sit on the floor, as this can cause warping and other damage.
Vinyl Planks
Because vinyl floors are completely waterproof, they are easy to clean and maintain. It is simple to remove almost any stain from a vinyl floor in a short amount of time. Scuffs and marks can also be removed, albeit this may require a little more cleaning. The durability of a vinyl floor makes cleaning and maintenance easier.
3. Appearance and Installation
Laminate Flooring
If you want to emulate the appearance and elegance of a genuine hardwood, ceramic, or stone floor but don’t want to spend a lot of money, try laminate. A high-quality laminate floor will not only appear exactly like ‘the real thing’, but it will also be much easier to install. Laminate floor planks are easy to cut and snap together, resulting in a smooth, seamless transition between planks.
Vinyl Flooring
While there are some vinyl floors with realistic embossing and thicker boards, the majority of vinyl floors are immediately identifiable as such. This is not to imply that there aren’t several instances of vinyl floors available in a variety of colors and finishes. In fact, there is a wide range of vinyl flooring styles, patterns, and finishes to fit almost any home or design concept. Vinyl floors, like laminate, are generally straightforward to install due to their interlocking planks.
4. Cost:
Vinyl and laminate flooring are typically less expensive than genuine hardwood, engineered wood, and some ceramic and porcelain options. This also applies to the installation expenses connected with each type of flooring, however vinyl floors are often less expensive to install than other floors, including laminate.
Vinyl Floor Average Cost
The cost per square foot will normally be between $1.00 and $5.00. The price is decided by the vinyl floor’s style (thin tiles versus thick planks) as well as the overall material quality. A premium vinyl plank may be more expensive than a lower-end laminate, but it will often provide more longevity and aesthetic value.
Laminate Floor Average Cost
Like vinyl, the actual price of the material will be determined by a number of factors. A laminate board ranging in thickness from 6mm to 8mm will typically cost roughly $1.00 per square foot. As thickness and quality grow, the price can reach $5.00 per square foot. A laminate plank that costs up to $5.00 per square foot should be at least 12mm thick.
Conclusion
Now that you have a firm understanding of laminate and vinyl flooring, you should be able to choose which type of floor is ideal for you. Each of these flooring materials has something to offer, and while they are comparable in price, performance, and appearance, your pick will most likely be based on aesthetics and application. If you have any further queries about deciding between laminate flooring and vinyl planks, please visit our flooring store in Surrey to compare our high-quality flooring materials firsthand.

Vinyl Flooring